October 2, 2017

Three Tips to Americanize Your Resume

Get your resume reviewed with more ease by recruiters with these three formatting tips. (Watch and read below the video for more information.)  


Video: Americanize Your Resume 
The video will summarize the tips you will read in this post.

Tip 1: Format Your Contact Information in an American Style 
While it is important to write your entire address on a job application, the current trend is to leave the entire address off of your resume. Let’s look at how American addresses are typically written (on postal envelopes or even in job applications, for example), then how we can write it (to save space) on a resume. 
Format your resume to be ready for career and job fairs.

Writing an Address on a Piece of Mail: 
House or Building Number Street Name Apt #
City, State Zip

Some Example Addresses: 
Jane Doe
700 Main Street Apt. #222
Anytown, Virginia 33993 

George Smith 
499 Pansy Lane 
Anytown, Washington 88110 


Notes:
  • If you live in a house, and not an apartment, do not add an apartment number
  • Follow the capitalization and punctuation rules as noted above.
  • The first letter of all words must be capitalized.
  • Some American addresses have a nine digit zip code (ex. 33993-9900). It is not necessary to remember or note these last digits on your job application.
  • State names can be abbreviated to two letters (see a list of state abbreviations here). If it is abbreviated, each letter has to be capitalized (Virginia, VA).

Noting Phone Numbers and E-mail IDs:
Phone numbers should be written in this format:
XXX-XXX-XXXX or (XXX) XXX-XXXX
With numbers added:
333-555-2342 or (333) 555-2342

E-mail IDs are to be noted like this:
username@domain.com
With information added:
janedoe@website.com

How to Write Contact Information on a Resume
Writing a full address on a resume, according to Yolanda Owens, Career Coach, Resume Writer and Founder of CareerSensei Consulting, is outdated. There is no need to write a full address on a resume. For a more modern resume header, which takes up much less space and makes it easier for recruiters to browse, try this: 


First Name Last Name
Phone | E-mail | Website (optional)

Jane Doe
(333) 555-2342 | janedoe@website.com | http://www.website.com

Note: Some list their LinkedIn or their online personal professional profile as a website link, if available. This is optional, so it is not needed.

The header can be left justified on the page, or centered depending on your style.

Tip 2: Note Your Job/Professional Experience in American Terminology
Sometimes, depending on your industry or your educational qualifications, terminology may differ between countries. If possible reach out to an American career coach or a friend or colleague living in the United States to ask if the terminology in the U.S. is different. If the terminology differs, consider changing the terminology to American English to make it easier and quicker to understand by the American recruiter.

Some Examples May Include:
Radio Station (Venezuela): Taxi Dispatcher (USA)
Plus 2 (India): High School Diploma (USA)

Feel free to share more examples in the comment section below.

Tip 3: What Not to Put on Your Resume - Personal Details

When Applying to Jobs in the U.S. Do Not Add This Information to Your Resume: 
  • Birth date 
  • Age 
  • Martial Status/Children 
  • Religion 
  • Citizenship 
  • Race 
  • Family Details / Father's Name
  • Other Personal Details 
  • References 
  • Declaration

Notes:
  1. Salary information may be required for resumes for U.S. government jobs. Salary information should not be written on resumes for any other position.
  2. Dates, as in the month and year, may be written on a resume to note job start and end dates. If there is any need to write out the month, date and year of a date, write the month out as a three letter abbreviation to assure there is no confusion between the month and year as Americans tend to write the month first, while other cultures write the date first. For example, in the image above, the date is written as 4-3-1987. Americans read this as April 3, where as other cultures may read this as March 4. 

While this information is not to be written on the resume, it may be required on a job application. The job application is a separate paper or online form that will require applicants to list their employment history, employer contacts, references, and some personal details as listed above. Some of those details may be optional or required depending on the employer application process. If they are optional, you do not need to fill it in.

**Any contact information detailed in this post was created for purposes of this post. Any likeness to real information is purely coincidental.
** Photo of woman courtesy of Illinois Springfield, creative commons at Flickr.

We hope these tips will help you to fine tune your resume when applying for jobs in the U.S. If you’d like more help or a personalized one on one session for a resume review, contact: 


Related Posts: 
Dos and Don'ts for Resume E-mail Attachments 
Tips for Interviewing with U.K. and U.S. Recruiters (Video Tutorials)   

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